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KNAW members - leading scientists from all disciplines - are chosen on the basis of their scientific achievements. There are now around 600 members. A membership is for life.

The new KNAW members from the UvA:

Rens Bod (photo: KNAW, Inge Hoogland)
Rens Bod (photo: KNAW, Inge Hoogland)

Rens Bod, professor of Digital Humanities and History of the Humanities

Bod is an influential computational humanities scientist, but he has also almost single-handedly established a new and vibrant field of research: the history of the humanities. His book ‘The Forgotten Sciences: A History of the Humanities’ (De vergeten wetenschappen: Een geschiedenis van de humaniora) was the first world history of the humanities and has been translated into seven languages. In the book, Bod shows how the scientific empirical method originated in the humanities, and then was adopted by the natural sciences. His recent book, ‘A World Full of Patterns: The History of Knowledge’ (Een wereld vol patronen: De geschiedenis van kennis) charts the general development of knowledge regimes. Bod regularly writes opinion pieces and is the founder of WOinActie, an action group that advocates for adequate financing for academic education and research.

Jeroen de Kloet (photo: Yiu Fai Chow)
Jeroen de Kloet (photo: Yiu Fai Chow)

Jeroen de Kloet, professor of Globalisation Studies

De Kloet conducts pioneering research into the popular culture of China. He combines a media studies approach to art, music, fashion, film and new media with insights from anthropology and communication science. For example, he has researched punk culture in China, the run-up to the Beijing Olympics, and ideas about fatherhood in Chinese reality shows. De Kloet does not shy away from investigating censorship and the limits of criticism in China, for example in a study of individual and political expression on the Chinese platform Weibo. He is always open to the different perspectives of Western and East Asian researchers.

Frank Lobbezoo (photo: ACTA)
Frank Lobbezoo (photo: ACTA)

Frank Lobbezoo, professor of Oral Function Studies, in particular Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction (ACTA)

As a dentist, Lobbezoo conducts research into teeth grinding, an often difficult to treat problem that can lead to pain and tooth wear. His research shows that teeth grinding has a behavioural component. It has led to innovative treatment methods for this sometimes-disabling problem. Lobbezoo also conducts research into facial pain and sleep disorders in relation to dentistry (for example, obstructive sleep apnea). His research has led to closer collaboration between dentistry and disciplines such as neurology, ear, nose and throat medicine, and anesthesiology. His non-invasive biopsychosocial approach to facial pain has led dentists towards a more careful working method with stronger scientific underpinning, and thus to fewer complications and lower costs.

Julia Noordegraaf (photo: Bob Bronshoff)
Julia Noordegraaf (photo: Bob Bronshoff)

Julia Noordegraaf, professor of Digital Heritage

Noordegraaf is an internationally recognised trailblazer in media research. She has been a leader in developing innovative and large-scale digital tools for media research and analysis. Examples are CLARIAH, an infrastructure for researchers in the humanities and social sciences, and Time Machine Europe, a simulator of 5,000 years of European history. In the Amsterdam Time Machine, the public can virtually travel back to the Amsterdam of earlier centuries, visiting neighbourhoods, streets and houses. Noordegraaf's work and approach has inspired others to develop new methodologies and technologies for accessing digital archives of television and radio, newspapers, books, scientific journals and new media.